Tag Archives: black sea

Bulgarian Road Trip: Sozopol

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Bulgarian Road Trip: Sozopol

After a relatively short journey, about an hour from Nesebar, we arrived in Sozopol. (Letter D on map). We found our apartment , but do you think we could find a parking space, we could not find a parking space anywhere. We did eventually find a car park at the end of our street. Well I say car park, it was a bit of wasteland with a ram shackled hut with a large sofa outside which had seen better days. And a rather dubious looking Bulgarian collecting the money. In fact, he turned out to be very nice and was very friendly, and all was legitimate. Also parking was very cheap 61 lev per day, around £2.80.

One thing we did not envisage was how busy the place was, as on doing our research beforehand Sozopol was labelled as a quieter family resort, so we thought it would be nice to relax by the sea for a couple of days, and also visit the old town and its attractions.

So after dragging our cases down a very long street we eventually arrived at our apartment, and we were not disappointed, it was very nice indeed, and had a balcony with a nice sea view. The elderly owners of the apartment and who live on the ground floor were lovely and very helpful. So our expectations of the town were upbeat.

After settling in we decided to have a walk around to get a feel of the area. It was not long before we both decided that Sozopol was perhaps not what we expected. Crowds of people, endless tacky souvenir shops, fast food stalls, and restaurants with the largest menus you have ever seen, which for us puts us off straight away. We were both feeling a little downcast. Luckily on our dejected walk back to our apartment we stumbled across a lovely Hotel and restaurant called Hotel Briz. Where we had a really nice meal, and a few glasses of wine. We both decided that we were perhaps both tired, and it will be a better day tomorrow.

With a new day ahead we ventured back into the old town. Sozopol is the oldest city on the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast. The first settlement here dates back to the end of the 4th millennium BC. So as you can imagine the architecture is amazing.

Visit the archaeological museum. Open Monday to Friday and is situated near the port it houses a fascinating collection of local finds from Apollonian days. Apparently the museum occasionally exhibits the skeleton of a local vampire, found with a stake driven through its chest, although it was not on display when we visited, which was a shame.

Another interesting place to visit is the Church of Sveta Bogoroditsa. This 15th-century church was built below street level, as required at the time by the Ottoman rulers. Set in a courtyard with a giant fig tree in the middle, it is one of the most picturesque and photographed places in town, with an exquisite wooden iconostasis and a magnificent carved pulpit. So after a good look around we were slightly warming to the place. The beauty of the old architecture and the quaint little streets you can wander around. Another place worth visiting is a traditional Bulgarian house Ethnographic house which is now a museum, which is very interesting indeed, where we learnt a great deal about life in a typical Bulgarian town and household. After we left the museum and on walking around the quaint streets, we came across locals who had set up stalls outside their homes selling local produce and crafts. Where we bought some very nice local honey. Don’t be put off visiting Sozopol as the old town is amazing, but when you venture into the new town it’s typical of any busy seaside town. We had originally booked three nights in Sozopol but cut our stay short as in my opinion you only need one full day to see everything. Tomorrow we move onto Plovdiv.