Little England. Nuwara Eliya.

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After our great few days in Ella it was time to move on. Next stop on our trip was Nuwara Eliya. Whilst we were in Ella we managed to get first class tickets for the journey, the cost of which was a 1000 lkr per person around £4.50 each. The journey takes around three hours and takes in some spectacular scenery along the way. The guide books and people we met who have done the journey say the best side to sit on, is the right side in the direction of travel for the best views, but this changes to the left side half way into the journey. Surprisingly as our first class carriage was relatively empty, we had the best of both worlds and could sit on the right and the left.

When we arrived, we immediately tried to get reserved seats for our onward journey to Kandy but surprisingly discovered there wasn’t any, in fact, the reserved seats were all booked for a whole month and we certainly wasn’t going to travel in the unreserved carriages, as we have seen how absolutely jammed packed they get. We later discovered that tour groups block book tickets. They take coach and mini bus loads to Nuwara Eliya from Kandy for a one night stay, then drop them at the rail station for the return journey back to Kandy in the morning.

We stayed in Nuwara Eliya for just two nights, which is enough in my opinion to see the main sights. The owner of the homestay we stayed at gave us a list of things to do in the area, and suggested we take a tour by Tuk Tuk. Fortunately for us we found a really nice Tuk Tuk driver at the station the day before. He asked us how long we were in town and what are our plans were, “well to be honest they all come out with the same line” but he seemed a real genuine guy so I took his number. Next day I gave the him a call, negotiated a price for the tour which was 3000 rupees which is around £13.50 for the five & half hour tour. On the way to our first stop, the Damro Tea plantation, our driver stopped at various viewpoints, explained how they harvest the tea leaves, how often they pick the leaves “once every 7 days”, basically all things to do with the tea growing business. I can assure you it was very interesting. One fact that he told us was about the tea pickers themselves. Firstly they are all woman, they work until the age of 55. Work an eight hour day and have to harvest between 18kg and 20kg of tea leaves per day to earn just 600 rupees which is £2.74. There is no company pension scheme, no worker benefits, just hard work, quite terrible really. He then pointed out the tea pickers homes which at first glance looked just like one average size bungalow in England. He then went on to tell us that this was not just one home in fact it was five, consisting of just one room with a family living in each. When we reached the Damro tea plantation we noticed that it was adorned with Chinese New Year banners, Chinese lanterns, and had coach loads of Chinese tourists arriving, even the Sri Lankan tea factory guides spoke Chinese. The factory itself was a very sterile experience. You really could not see much of the tea production except through perspex panels. It was in my opinion just a huge tourist attraction. Our Tuk Tuk driver told us that in fact it was a Chinese owned factory as Sri Lankan tea or Ceylon tea is very popular in China. He also told us that large Chinese companies are buying up some of the more profitable tea companies in Sri Lanka. Also they are investing heavily in the country’s infrastructure, roads, rail etc. We were having an in depth conversation with an owner of a homestay we were staying in, who was also a lawyer, she told us that the people are not really happy about the situation. I really do hope that the country doesn’t loose it its identity in years to come. Next stop was the much nicer Bluefield Tea Factory which is owned by two brothers and has been producing tea since the late eighteen hundreds. Touring the tea factory was a much nicer and personal experience, also much more informative. We then visited a couple of waterfalls which were quite spectacular and this was in the dry season. After our tour had finished we got the guy to drop us off at the Grand Hotel for afternoon tea “which one has to partake”. Afternoon tea at the Grand is mentioned in most of the guide books, so we thought why not. The Grand Hotel is one of the many colonial buildings in Nuwara Eliya, hence the name “Little England” Tea is served on a lovely terrace with, as you would expect, a three tiered cake stand with all the goodies that come with afternoon tea. The price for all this is 1300 rupees per person £5.97, considering how much you would have to pay in a high end hotel in the uk for this it’s an absolute bargain. Next stop was the Hill Club another throwback from the British Empire. It was originally a gentleman’s club, quite what that means exactly, but is now a lovely hotel. It costs 100 rupees to look around £0.46 but it’s well worth it. While you’re there have a nice cold beer in the really quaint bar. There are some other attractions, like the old post office and a golf course. Also there is Victoria Park, which we didn’t visit as it costs 300 rupees for foreigners and 30 for locals. It wasn’t the money it’s just that in Sri Lanka the prices for foreigners (tourists) are so over inflated, it was the principal. Besides I can visit much grander parks in the uk for free. Next Stop Kandy.

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